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HUNGARY – BUDAPEST

Budapest, the capital of Hungary. This romantic city is divided by the River Danube. The city boasts freely in its rich background of historical and cultural attractions. Its natural parks are scenic, the museums embrace the history of the city, and the embankments and pictographic caves are a sight to behold. The city is also known for its festivals, concerts, arts and the city’s renowned operatic and music events.

Hungary’s capital city Budapest is actually made up of 3 unified cities, with Buda and Óbuda on the west bank of the Danube and Pest on the east bank. Much of the city has been granted UNESCO World Heritage Site status, and many visitors consider the city to be amongst the most beautiful cities in Europe. From unforgettable delicacies to eat at one of the many eateries, taking a dip in the hot spring inspired thermal spas, museum tours and tons of fine wine; there is something here for everyone! So browse through below and find out the most iconic things to do in Budapest, Hungary!

VISA REQUIREMENTS

South African passport holders do require a visa for Budapest and Hungary for stays of up to 90 days. Also, South African temporary passports are not accepted.

Passports may not be older than 10 years, must have 2 blank pages and be valid for at least 3 months beyond your date of departure from the Schengen state.

Visa Cost: 80€

Compulsory Vaccinations Required: N/A

Please note: Visa and vaccination information is correct at time of publish and are subject to change

BEST TIME TO TRAVEL 

March to May, and September to November

AREAS TO VISIT AND THEIR MAIN ATTRACTIONS

BUDAPEST

For a fresh perspective on the Hungarian capital, see it from the waters of the River Danube. Upon its banks, the Neo-Gothic Hungarian parliament building stands opposite the ornate Buda Castle and Fisherman’s Bastion, while river cruises also provide views of the Liberty Statue, Chain Bridge and Margaret Island.

Hungary has a rich tradition of folk dancing – Budapest even has its own college dedicated to the study of these historical dances. The art of Hungarian folk dance offers a fascinating insight into the music, costumes and dance heritage of Hungary through the years. To experience a real-life Hungarian folk show first-hand, grab tickets for a 1.5 hour performance at the Danube Palace (Duna Palota) theatre by one of Hungary’s foremost folk ensembles – either the Danube Folk Ensemble, Hungarian State Folk Ensemble or Rajkó Folk Ensemble.

Many class St Stephen’s Basilica as the jewel in Budapest’s crown. Taking pride of place in the centre of the city, the world-famous Roman Catholic Basilica is named after Stephen, the first King of Hungary who ruled between 975 and 1038CE.’

Situated in the heart of Budapest City Park, the Széchenyi Baths is one of Europe’s largest thermal bath complexes. Built in 1913, the spa houses three large outdoor pools, 10 inside plunge pools, massage rooms, saunas, steam rooms and even a beer bath.

The Hungarian Parliament Building is among Budapest’s leading attractions, drawing nearly 700,000 visitors each year. Situated on the UNESCO-listed banks of the River Danube, the building is one of the finest examples of Gothic Revival and Renaissance Revival architecture in the world. The House of Parliament is still very much a functioning law-making body today, but it is open to the public at certain designated times.

The Hungarian Parliament Building is among Budapest’s leading attractions, drawing nearly 700,000 visitors each year. Situated on the UNESCO-listed banks of the River Danube, the building is one of the finest examples of Gothic Revival and Renaissance Revival architecture in the world. The House of Parliament is still very much a functioning law-making body today, but it is open to the public at certain designated times.

The Neo-Romanesque lookout towers housed within the Fisherman’s Bastion provide some of the best views across Budapest. Built between 1895 and 1902, its seven towers symbolise the Seven Chieftains of the Magyars who founded the Hungarian nation in 895CE. Today’s structure stands where thick walls once protected Buda Castle from enemy attack – legend has it that the building was protected by the guild of fishermen, giving the Bastion its nameThe

Széchenyi Chain Bridge is an impressive example of 19th-century engineering spanning the River Danube, linking Buda to Pest.

Built in 1896, Heroes’ Square takes pride of place at the tip of Andrássy Avenue, Budapest’s Champs-Élysées-esque boulevard replete with upmarket stores, cafes and restaurants. Heroes’ Square features the colossal Seven Chieftains of the Magyars statue complex and the Memorial Stone of Heroes, which stands in tribute to those who have died defending Hungary.

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